State forecasts revenue increases of over $4 billion for 2019-2021, over $7 billion for 2021-2023, increase of $671 million to 2017-2019 forecast

Cumulative major General Fund-State (GF-S) revenue collections from November 11, 2017 through February 10, 2018 were $185 million (3.5%) higher than forecasted in November.

https://www.washingtonpolicy.org/publications/detail/revenue-forecast-leaves-no-doubt-it-is-time-for-tax-cuts

http://archive.is/IiuC9

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Seattle panel closing in on plan to fund homeless aid with a business ‘head tax’

“A version of the tax almost won approval last year, but the council narrowly voted for more process instead, punting the issue to a panel of citizens and experts.

That move put the idea on the political back burner, but not for long, because the council vowed to revisit it with recommendations from the community task force and adopt a head tax (also called an employee-hours tax) or something similar by March 26.

“The $25 million-per-year-proposal rejected in November — as the council finalized the city’s 2018 budget — would have taken 6.5 cents per employee, per hour, from companies grossing more than $10 million per year (about 5 percent of all businesses in Seattle).”

http://archive.is/LEpff

Behind Seattle’s government spending spree: a deluge of taxes, six-figure pay and officials eager to do more

The cost of Seattle’s government grew faster than almost any major U.S. city over five years, propelled by surging tax collections and an expanded scope of government services.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/times-watchdog/seattle-went-on-a-government-spending-spree-with-a-deluge-of-taxes-six-figure-pay-and-officials-eager-to-do-more/

http://archive.is/xIKlL

Why Does Sweden Have So Many Start-Ups?

“Sweden used to have a heavily regulated economy in which public monopolies dominated the market, which made it difficult for such replacements to occur, but regulations have since been eased. While Sweden was making it harder for monopolies to dominate the market, the U.S. was changing its regulatory landscape to favor big companies and established firms (largely through overturning anti-monopoly laws and permitting industry consolidation), argues Lars Persson, an economist at Sweden’s Research Institute of Industrial Economics who has studied new-business creation in Sweden.”

“Sweden also gives some credence to the controversial idea that cutting corporate tax rates can help stimulate entrepreneurship. The reforms of 1991 lowered corporate income taxes from 52 percent to 30 percent. (Sweden’s corporate tax rate today, at 22 percent, is much lower than the U.S.’s 39 percent, though few companies actually pay a rate that high.)”

“Before the 1990s, there was also little foreign competition in Sweden. Protectionist legislation prohibited foreigners from taking substantial ownership in Swedish companies, and fewer than five percent of private-sector employees worked in foreign-owned companies in the 1980s. Then, Sweden opened its market to foreign competition in the 1990s, which helped in a few ways. Instantly, there were more companies that could acquire mature start-ups, which added to the incentives to start new businesses; Mojang, the gaming company, for instance, was acquired by Microsoft for $2.5 billion in 2014. And inefficient domestic firms that weren’t able to compete with foreign firms tended to go out of business, creating a vacuum in which new companies could arise. The share of foreign ownership of Swedish companies shot up from 7 percent in 1989 to 40 percent in 1999.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/09/sweden-startups/541413

http://archive.is/AdTzc